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DISCREPANCY AND ASSOCIATION BETWEEN PERCEIVED SLEEP STATE AND OBJECTIVE SLEEP MEASURES IN OLDER ADULTS WITH SLEEP COMPLAINTS

W.C. Liao, S.Y. Tsai, C.P. Kuo, L. Wang, C. Lo, H. Ting, M.J. Chiu

J Aging Res Clin Practice 2013;2(1):142-147

Objective: We investigated sleep state and the perception of sleep state in a group of community dwelling elders with sleep disturbance. Discrepancy between perceived and measured sleep and its relation to sleep quality and sleep structure were examined. Design: A cross-section correlation study. Setting: Sleep laboratory in a medical center. Participants: Thirty-two healthy older adults (mean age 63.0 years, 19 women and 13 men) with sleep disturbance (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score ≥ 5). Measurements: Participants were scheduled to sleep three consecutive nights to receive overnight polysomnography (PSG) and completed the Morning Questionnaire the next morning. Results: PSG showed 379.5 minutes of total sleep time (TST) with nocturnal awakenings of 48 minutes, and a sleep efficiency of 85.7%. Participants perceived 344.4 minutes of TST with awakenings of 29.6 minutes and a sleep efficiency of 80.4%. Significant differences (t=2.07-2.85, p< .05) existed between perceived and measured sleep. About one-third (31.3%) markedly underestimated (> 60 min) their TST. Discrepancy between the perceived and measured TST was negatively correlated with the duration of stage 1 sleep and sleep quality, which indicated that participants with poor sleep quality and longer stage 1 sleep perceived a shorter than actual TST. Conclusions: Older adults with sleep complaints have poor objective sleep. Both sleep structure and cognitive components affect the perception of sleep state.

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