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EFFECTS OF CONTROLLED WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION TRAINING ON FUNCTIONAL PERFORMANCE AMONG HEALTHY OLDER ADULTS: A 6-WEEK PILOT STUDY

F. Saucedo, E.A. Chavez, H.R. Vanderhoof, J.D. Eggleston

J Aging Res & Lifestyle 2021;10:39-44

Background: Falling is the second leading cause of injury-related death worldwide and is a leading cause of injury among older adults. Whole-body vibration has been used to improve fall risk factors in older adults. No study has assessed if vibration benefits can be retained over time. Objectives: The aims of this study were to examine if six-weeks of whole-body vibration could improve fall risk factors and to assess if benefits associated with the training program could be sustained two months following the final training session. Design and Setting: Repeated measures randomized controlled design. Participants: Twenty-four independent living older adults were recruited and were randomly assigned to the WBV or control group. Intervention: Participants performed three sessions of whole-body vibration training per week with a vibration frequency of 20Hz or with only an audio recording of the vibration noise. An assessment of fall risk factors was performed prior to, immediately following, and two-months after the completion of the training program. Main Outcome Measures: Fall risk factors including functional capacity, mobility, strength, and walking speed were assessed pre-training, post-training, and two-months post-training. Results: Seventeen participants completed the study. No improvements (p<0.05) between groups were found in the measures of physical performance. Conclusions: Findings revealed that six weeks of whole-body vibration is not effective in improving fall risk factors or producing benefits post-training.

CITATION:
F. Saucedo ; E.A. Chavez ; H.R. Vanderhoof ; J.D. Eggleston ; (2021): EFFECTS OF CONTROLLED WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION TRAINING ON FUNCTIONAL PERFORMANCE AMONG HEALTHY OLDER ADULTS: A 6-WEEK PILOT STUDY. The Journal of Aging and Lifestyle (JARLife). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jarlife.2021.7

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