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TOOTH LOSS, PERIODONTAL DISEASE, AND MINERAL CONTENT OF CALCIUM AND MAGNESIUM IN THE DIET OR URINE IN THE ELDERLY

A. Yoshihara, R. Watanabe, M. Nishimuta, H. Miyazaki

J Aging Res Clin Practice 2013;2(1):126-130

Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess whether tooth loss or periodontal disease is related to the intake of selected nutrients or to the amount of key nutrients found in urine. Methods: We evaluated the number of present teeth and the mean clinical attachment level (CAL) in 57 people aged 74 years. All food intakes were measured by a precise weighing method for 3 consecutive days. Furthermore, selected components of partition urine excretion were measured. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to assess the relationship between the number of remaining teeth or mean CAL and dietary and urinary Ca/Mg molar ratio. Results: Mean clinical attachment level was significantly associated with urinary Ca/Mg molar ratios by standardized coefficients after adjusting for gender smoking habits and the number of remaining teeth. The standardized coefficients were 0.33 (p=0.031). In addition, the number of remaining teeth was significantly associated with both urinary and dietary Ca/Mg molar ratios by standardized coefficients after adjusting for gender and smoking habits. The standardized coefficients were -0.38 (p=0.006) and -0.31 (p=0.020), respectively. Conclusions: This study suggests that dietary and urinary Ca/Mg molar ratios are significantly associated with tooth loss. In addition, there is a significant relationship between urinary Ca/Mg molar ratio and periodontal disease, which is the main reason for tooth loss.

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